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Hitler’s Olympics

Filed in Television by on August 26, 2016 0 Comments
Hitler’s Olympics

The summer Olympic Games of 1936 in Berlin set a precedent for future Olympics. In terms of packaging and presentation, they would be a vehicle for slick propaganda — a projection of German national pride and glory. Daniel Kontur’s 44-minute documentary, Hitler’s Olympics, which is now available on the Netflix streaming service, deftly explores this […]

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The Alt Right Movement

Filed in Guest Voices by on August 26, 2016 0 Comments
The Alt Right Movement

Ever since he entered the race to become the Republican candidate for president, Donald Trump has been accused of being a bigot, a racist, an antisemite, a xenophobe, a nativist, a right-wing populist, and a fascist. He has been compared to, among others, Benito Mussolini, Silvio Berlusconi, Juan Peron, Vladimir Putin, even Adolf Hitler. David […]

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The Last Days Of Stalin

Filed in Arts by on August 25, 2016 0 Comments
The Last Days Of Stalin

On Sunday, March 1, 1953, Joseph Stalin’s longtime maid, Matryona Petrovna, found him lying on the floor in his library. He was unconscious and his night clothes were drenched in urine. The supreme leader of the Soviet Union had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and was at death’s door. Petrovna quickly alerted his guards, who promptly […]

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Fighting Terrorism On Different Fronts

Filed in Commentary by on August 23, 2016 0 Comments
Fighting Terrorism On Different Fronts

Terrorism is the scourge of our times. We live in a dangerous and uncertain epoch, when jihadists rake restaurants with gunfire, suicide bombers detonate explosive vests and terrorists plant bombs aboard airplanes. Since the horrific events of September 11, 2001, when 19 Arabs commandeered three American commercial airliners and ruthlessly crashed them into the World Trade […]

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Seymour Hersh: Scoop Artist

Filed in Arts by on August 22, 2016 0 Comments
Seymour Hersh: Scoop Artist

In his prime, from the late 1960s to the opening years of the 21st century, Seymour (Sy) Hersh was one of the great investigative reporters of our times. A dogged journalist with a nose for news, he uncovered the 1968 My Lai massacre in Vietnam, which earned him the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, […]

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German Politician Does The Right Thing

Filed in Commentary by on August 20, 2016 0 Comments
German Politician Does The Right Thing

Politicians tend to be very mindful and careful in public settings. Being on their best behavior, they strive for political correctness, avoiding comments or gestures that might be deemed offensive or inappropriate. Germany’s vice chancellor, Sigmar Gabriel, a Social Democrat, dispensed with these weighty calculations during a recent election campaign event in Lower Saxony as about […]

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Weimar — A Microcosm Of Germany’s Tangled Past

Filed in Travel by on August 19, 2016 0 Comments
Weimar — A Microcosm Of Germany’s Tangled Past

Weimar, a pleasant city in the eastern state of Thuringia, is where the tangled and irreconcilable strands of Germany’s history meet abruptly. Although Weimar was the birthplace of the short-lived Weimar Republic, Thuringia was a bastion of the Nazi movement, having been the first state in Germany where two Nazi officials, Wilhelm Frick and Fritz […]

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British Islamic Radical Faces Justice

Filed in Commentary by on August 18, 2016 0 Comments
British Islamic Radical Faces Justice

Islamic State, the jihadist organization which has cut a swath of death and destruction across the Middle East and Europe, fully exploits social media to recruit new recruits. Thousands of Muslims and Muslim converts from around the world have been brainwashed by its postings on the Internet. Having been seduced by its radical Islamic message, they’ve […]

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Villa In Baghdad Falls Prey To Urban Development

Filed in Middle East by on August 16, 2016 0 Comments
Villa In Baghdad Falls Prey To Urban Development

I was disappointed, though not really surprised, by the news that the 19th century villa of Yechezkel Sasson, in central Baghdad, was recently demolished. Sasson, who was usually known as Sir Sassoon Eskell, was the scion of a distinguished Iraqi Jewish family and one of the founders of modern Iraq. Along with T.E. Lawrence, Gertrude […]

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Turkey A Month After The Failed Coup

Filed in Guest Voices by on August 15, 2016 0 Comments
Turkey A Month After The Failed Coup

A month has passed since the July 15 failed coup in Turkey, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has consolidated his power like never before. Indeed, not since the days of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the father of the modern Turkish Republic, has any figure dominated the country for as long as Erdogan has. Fethullah Gulen, a […]

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